There’s a Midwife for Every Woman

It’s been said there’s a midwife for every woman, and I truly believe that to be true. I’ve been to many midwifery conferences and other midwifery gatherings, and while we all share that common bond of midwifery, it is clear that there can be big differences between us. To generalize, there are “hippie midwives,” Christian midwives, parteras – Spanish for midwives, young or old midwives, male midwives, married midwives, single midwives, Amish midwives… the list goes on. Midwifery is what we share. At the core, we agree on the value of serving women selflessly, helping women through the life journey of womanhood into motherhood, honoring women and their families in the ways that only the midwifery model of care can offer.

Yet, there are differences, even within the same community. So, when considering your options, how do you know which midwife is the right midwife for you?

Create a clear picture of who you want to serve you at your birth, before you begin your search.

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It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of creating the plan to have your baby at home or at a birth center, but, be sure to take a moment to consider what you truly want from a midwife before starting your search. What is your personal birth philosophy? How do you feel about laboratory testing and ultrasounds? Do you want all of your visits at home, or are you OK with going to an office? Do you need someone with a strong, authoritarian personality or someone with a more cooperative and gentle personality? Visualize what would make you most comfortable. Sit with that image awhile. This exercise is akin to creating a mission statement for a company. When there is clarity around what you want, everything else will fall into place.

Do your homework before you interview a care provider.

Lucky for you, in the Internet age, researching a midwife is not terribly difficult. You can start with Googling her name. If your midwife has been practicing for awhile, chances are that people will have written something about her online. Most midwives have at least some sort of online presence. Just about all have a website or Facebook page. Some have blogs (like me!).

Birth Partners, and Mothers Naturally are great online directories of midwives. You can do a Google search for your zip code and midwife, and you should be able to come up with midwives who are local to you.

Look on FacebookYelp or Health Grades for reviews from people who have used her services.There will likely be blog and message board posts, as well as reviews on Healthgrades, Facebook, and her Google Business page.

Check with the state corporation commission to see if the midwife’s practice has registered with the state. The state midwifery board (for CPMs) and state nursing board(for CNMs) will have information about the status of a licensed midwife’s license (CPM) or status of a licensed nurse practitioner (CNM), including any complaints against her or disciplinary actions from the appropriate regulatory board. Keep in mind though, there’s always more to the story than what you see online. A midwife who has been in practice for many years is more likely to have come under scrutiny than someone who is newly licensed, and the birth culture of your state can have an impact on such scrutiny . Read the information ahead of time to give you a starting point for the discussion. The way she responds about the information you found will tell you a lot about her character and professionalism.

Ask friends for recommendations.

Many will say, “I just loved my midwife!” All midwives hope for that response to their care from clients. But be sure to dig deeper and ask, “What was it that you loved most about your midwife?” The aspects one person loves may be the aspects that another person would not like. Be specific and ask about the things that you’ve already identified as important to you. Maybe your friend liked that her midwife was opposed to using a Doppler to listen to the baby’s heartbeat and prefers to use a fetoscope, but you really want to use a Doppler. Or, perhaps your friend liked that her midwife was very “hands-on,” and you want someone who is very “hands-off.”

Ask the birth workers.

The birth world is a small world. Doulas, childbirth educators, and your friends probably know a lot about the local midwives. Ask them about the midwives you’re considering – someone may have first-hand experience with them.

Look to the mom groups in your community.

Just about every community has a birth circle or La Leche League group or some sort of birth advocacy group. These groups can be a great way to meet women who have used the services of local midwives and can give you feedback about their experiences with them. And many midwives offer meet and greet sessions at birth circles or attend the meetings as members of the community.

Contacting a midwife

Most important is the “click” factor. Many moms report knowing that a midwife was right for her because they just “clicked.” Follow your intuition to make the best decision for you and your baby.

If you’re not sure which midwife to hire, consider interviewing several midwives until you find the one who is the right fit. Set up an appointment and prepare for the interview with a list of specific questions, concerns, and wishes.

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